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The deadly danger that polluted air is bringing to patients with heart problems

Air pollution reduces the chances of survival for people who have undergone a heart transplant, researchers have found.

People living in areas where there are soot particles in the air have a 26 percent increased chance of dying because of a new heart infection, transmits news.com. 

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University in Ohio tracked nearly 22,000 people who had a heart transplant between 2004 and 2015.

Those living in areas where pollution levels violated national boundaries were 26 percent more likely to die within 4.8 years of operation than those living in areas with cleaner air.

Study leader Professor Sanjay Rajagopalan, whose findings are published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, said that "long-term exposure to air pollution appears to pose increased risks to those who have a new heart transplanted."

Cardiac transplant recipients are vulnerable to infections because their immune systems collapse after surgery to reduce the chance of rejection of the new organ.

The deadly danger that polluted air is bringing to patients with heart problems


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