List of Idioms that commonly used in English language

List of Idioms that commonly used in English language

Idioms

All of these are casual (informal) expressions, but you will see them written in songs, poems and novelsThey should be used in official documents only with a lot of attention or not at all.
(to) add insult to injury: we say "as if this was not enough ...". By word translating: adding insult to the injury.
a no-brainer: something you do not want too much to understand
a run for your money: something worthy of your expectations, which is worth it
back-seat driver: someone who instructs the driver while he is sitting in the back seat is criticized by a security post
(to) be in somebody else's shoes: being (or going) to someone else's position
(to) be the fifth wheel: to be (like) the spare tire of the car, ie not necessary or rarely useful
(to) be filthy rich: being rich
(to) be fresh out of (eg new ideas): have you finished (eg new ideas)
(to) go by the book: to keep the rules
(to) be grounded: being punished
(to) bend over backwards: doing something very difficult, for example. to serve someone
(to) be up to something: preparing (or preparing for) something
(to) be well off: being wealthy
(to) call it a day: end for today, arrives for now
(to) call the shots : giving the orders / instructions / instructions
catch you later: I'll see you later
did you catch my drift? "Catch" the meaning, you understand what I say / mean;
excuse my french: sorry for my nasty tongue or for the rocks I say (or will say)
(to) get cold feet about something: I shudder about something
(to) get the short end of the stick I'm losing a deal / deal
(to) get pissed ...: I 'm pissing, I get "
(to) have a sweet tooth: to like sweets
here's to ...: on his or her health
how come ...? how and how, how is it, why?
I have a game: I agree, I am involved
in the nick of time: at the last minute
it's so groovy: it 's so nice, lovely, sweet, cool
(it's time to)  hit the sack:  time to go to your bed
(to) keep your fingers crossed: to wish (eg to do something)
(to) know something like the back of my hand:knowing something very well, out of the way and stirring, from the good and the reverse
(to) live on a shoestring: I live with very little money, very economical
(a) long shot : a very unlikely event
(to) lose face: to afflict your prestige
neck and neck: Chest with chest (literally neck-to-neck), also neck to neck
not my cup of tea: something that I do not really care about or I do not like
once in a blue moon: very rare
out of the blue: suddenly, out of nowhere, where you do not expect it
outside the box: original, otherwise, unusual / unconventional
a piece of cake: something very easy (and probably pleasant)
(to) pull my leg: to make fun, to joke
(to) put myself in somebody else's shoes: putting myself in the position of someone else
(to) rain cats and dogs: it rains carrion, very loud
red handed: to the leeks
(to) rub salt into the wound:  we say "as if this was not enough ...". By word translating: I rub salt on the wound.
(to) show the ropes: showing (to someone else) the tricks, the locals, the secrets
kind of: somehow
(to) take a shot : try, try (for) something that might be difficult and / or unlikely
(to) talk me into something: convincing me
(to) take (someone) for a ride: to fool, to cheat, to "catch Kotsos" (someone). But it can just mean a walk (with the car).
(to) throw a party: giving a party, doing a party
(to) turn a blind eye: turning a blind eye
(to) wag the dog: to make a distraction move. Normally "the dog wags its tail"
(to) wake up on the wrong side of the bed:waking (or starting your day) with a very bad mood
 what's the scoop? what is the essence, the central meaning, the "resume"
 what's up? what's going on, what's running?
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