The taste of water is the sixth "sensation" of the language

The taste of water is the sixth "sensation" of the language
Water really has its own flavor, which explains how animals can distinguish the water from other liquids, and this flavor, according to scientists, should be considered independent and fit into the previously recognized flavors of salty, sweet, bitter, bitter and umami.


 
The human language can detect five basic flavors: sweet, sour, bitter, salty and umami. Recently, researchers from the California Institute of Technology have discovered a sixth sensation that can detect water. "Tongue can identify various key nutrients (tastes) - such as sodium, sugar and amino acids - through taste," says lead researcher Yuki Oka. "However, how we perceive water in the mouth was unknown. Many species of insects are known to" taste "water, so it was imagined that mammals could have some mechanism in the flavor system to detect water."

Oka measured the electrical responses from the taste receptor cells in the tongues of laboratory mice when coming into contact with clean water and other flavors. The study, published in Nature Neuroscience , found that tasting nerves responded to the five basic flavors but also to the water.

The researchers created an experiment with bright signals that stimulate the sour taste instead of water, making the thirsty mice "drink" the light because their brain was deceived and believed that it was water: To the surprise of all, some of its mice team went and licked the mouth with light up to 2,000 times every 10 minutes in an attempt to quench their thirst. The mice never knew that light was just an illusion, but they continued to drink enough time longer than normal water would drink. This shows that although signals from cellular taste receptors in the tongue can trigger pot, they do not play a role in telling the brain when to stop. The results suggest that water is detected through sour cell cells, "Oka added. His team used a technique called optogenetics to activate the cells. The goal was to see if they could make the mice drink water without having real water and they did it. The "cause" has not yet been determined, but scientists believe that pH levels in the cells change when the water swirls around the saliva and this causes the cells to react. However nice it is to believe that there are five different groups of cellular receptors for the five specific flavors, research shows that things are much more complicated than that, and perhaps there could be many additional senses that are not immediately perceived. The goal was to see if they could make the mice drink water without having real water and they did it. The "cause" has not yet been determined, but scientists believe that pH levels in the cells change when the water swirls around the saliva and this causes the cells to react. However nice it is to believe that there are five different groups of cellular receptors for the five specific flavors, research shows that things are much more complicated than that, and perhaps there could be many additional senses that are not immediately perceived. The goal was to see if they could make the mice drink water without having real water and they did it. The "cause" has not yet been determined, but scientists believe that pH levels in the cells change when the water swirls around the saliva and this causes the cells to react. However nice it is to believe that there are five different groups of cellular receptors for the five specific flavors, research shows that things are much more complicated than that, and perhaps there could be many additional senses that are not immediately perceived. but scientists believe that pH levels in cells change when the water swirls around saliva and this causes the cells to react. However nice it is to believe that there are five different groups of cellular receptors for the five specific flavors, research shows that things are much more complicated than that, and perhaps there could be many additional senses that are not immediately perceived. but scientists believe that pH levels in cells change when the water swirls around saliva and this causes the cells to react. However nice it is to believe that there are five different groups of cellular receptors for the five specific flavors, research shows that things are much more complicated than that, and perhaps there could be many additional senses that are not immediately perceived.

Read Also: Water: the strong ally of health

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